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and welcome. five months after the uprising after colonel gaddafi's roll, britain has recognized the rebel council as the new government of libya. the u.s., france, and more than 30 other countries have recognized the council. our world affairs editor has this assessment. >> the libyan embassy in central london. a hugely valuable piece of real estate. the siege as usual by a small, ever present group of demonstrators. they were overjoyed by britain's decision to recognize them. this is tripoli where the heart of the city was the green square is decorated with a gigantic portrait of colonel gaddafi himself. he has never been a man to shrink from self publicity. britain, which was keenest about bombing libya has decided to cut the last remaining diplomatic links. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new diplomat to take over the embassy in london. >> britain has joined 29 other countries in recognizing the national transitional council. france did so at the start. germany, turkey, and
for this to end. >> this is newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. >> i am in london libya has condemned britain's decision to expel all of colonel khadafy's lipitor -- diplomats after recognizing the transitional council as the libyan government. >> norway has launched an independent inquiry into friday said the attacks. >> let's get more on that story now. thomas edgar was one of the first journalist on the scene after last friday's mass killing on the island. he says police reacted relatively quickly, despite criticism of their response time. >> there seems to be a lot of tension, especially among the journalists. in my opinion, they had two options. one was to wait for the helicopters being scrambled from one of the army bases, which was outside of oslo, then to get a pickup point, load their gear, flight to the island, etc. or they could go directly to the island, which is approximately 35 kilometers outside oslo. what police have been repeatedly saying house -- the last couple of days is that they made the right decision. they just jump in the car and made their way to the island and were
." >> this is bbc world news america. i m.j. and o'brien. britain recognizes the main opposition group as the governing authority, but will it break the stalemate? still on alert in norway, the suffering from last week's attacks continue to grip the country as the government promises an investigation. and counting down to the olympics, with just one year to go. london is busy getting ready. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of nato bombing and continuing combat on the ground, the international effort to remove moammar gaddafi from power got another boost today. britain declared but another governing authority and expel the remaining diplomats from london. this follows the move by the u.s. and paves the way to unfreezing millions in dollars. but will it make a difference on the ground? john simpson reports. >> 6:00 in the morning in the mountains. spies have warned of a buildup of pro gaddafi forces nearby, but these are not trained soldiers. they are just a bunch of volunteers. hours pass, and the gaddafi troops do not attack. the rebels w
had a good discussion today about how we can build on the agreement, and i said how britain will support this, investing in projects to build the key tray corridors and simplify and speed up border crossings. as the president has said, we also had important discussions on developments in the middle east, in north africa, and in zimbabwe. we share the same strategic vision. we believe people's legitimate aspirations for a job and a voice must be met with reform and openness, not with repression and violence. on libya, i thanked president zuma for south africa's support in securing united nations security resolution 1970 and 1973 and voice leadership in the african union on this vital issue. now, it is no secret that we have disagreed on some aspects of how to respond to violence in libya, but we are agreed on the immediate imperative that all sides must take every effort to avoid the loss of civilian life. we agree on the process needed that the only safe and peaceful solution lies through a political transition, led and owned by the libyan people and backed by the united nat
on the ground? we have this report. >> the government now is a significant boost for them. britain is following the u.s. and france in intensify the pressure on the libyan regime. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government, and we are inviting the transitional council to appoint a new diplomatic convoy to take over the embassy in london. >> the libyan embassy in london is in nights bridge. the ambassador here was expelled in may. now, they have three days to leave. the other diplomats must go, as well. and they must deal with the frozen assets, now controlled by opponents of the regime. this is an important symbolic moment, especially for the small group of rebel supporters, who come here but to replace the flag of the gaddafi regime with their alone. the question is, what difference will it make on the ground? joining the demonstrators today, a former financial adviser at the embassy. >> this is very positive. it is a psychological boost, and the council will be able to use those funds to help the libyan people, and hopefully, this is just the beginning. >>
culture in britain. there is no evidence the "new york post" published stories similar to those published in "news of the world" or "the sun." it does at the least raise questions about the journalism here. >> in other news, security forces in syria have shot at least 20 protesters across the country. throughout the day, thousands of people staged some of the biggest protests so far against the rule of president asisad. roughly 1400 civilians have died since the uprising began in march. in egypt, thousands rallied in the two largest cities. five months after president mubarak was removed from power, they are becoming impatient with the interim military rulers. they are demanding that police officers accused of killing protesters during the uprising be put on trial. in libya, the fighting continues. the main opposition group was given a diplomatic boost today. the united states and other nations have recognized it as the governing authority in the country. the announcement came from istanbul where secretary of state hillary clinton is meeting with other members of the group. for more on th
authorities. britain announces its next epps to push the gaddafi regime out. >> we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new libyan envoy in london. >> welcome to gmt. i am naga munchetty. intelligence chief says the man behind friday's attacks acted completely on his own. >> one year until the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympic games, i am live at the aquatic center. speaking to athletes about their expectations ahead of the tournament. >> hello. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and the foreign office has just unveiled the latest deaths in the campaign to push the libyan leader, -- the latest steps in the campaign to push the libyan leader, muammar gaddafi, out of power. we'll get reaction from tripoli in a moment. first, here is the announcement made by the british foreign secretary. >> we informed him that he and other regime diplomats from the gaddafi regime must now leave the united kingdom. we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new envo
not have any words. she is sad. >> what they want is for colonel gaddafi to stand trial. this week, britain shifted its position. they said that colonel gaddafi must leave power, he could stay on in the country if that is what the people want. look at what happened here. look at the scale of destruction. hundreds of people died in the battle for misrata and they cannot forget or forgive. what they want is justice. however much britain frowns on america on a quick settlement, it is difficult to imagine a solution that is acceptable for the government in tripoli and the people of misrata. the city is still under attack. a petrol depot struck by rockets this week, this is hardly conducive for peace talks. the truth is that misrata remains on a war footing, hundreds of its men are dug-in, stretching for miles along the latest from lines. they are a little bit more organized, better equipped, even if they cannot always see who they are firing at. they plan to go all the way to tripoli. progress has been slower than britain and the west hoped-for. the fighting, not talking, that is the concentrat
time after timed. i've witnessed it firsthand in great britain, places like sweden where people would never believe there are no go zones for police in these enclaves in europe and even a place like dearborn in america is developing into that but the hub, the center of activity in each of these cases is, yes, the mosque. >> host: all right. you mentioned that they're going up all over the country. one of the ones that you talk about is the islamic center of murfreesboro, tennessee. we've been fixated on the ground zero mosque in manhattan. large facilities like northern environmental. but this is on 52,000 square feet in a tiny suburb of nashville, all right? why? what -- what is the strategy there because you spend a lot of time talking about this in the book. and this -- you know, aide guy from the defense department when i was going to a briefing on this tell me, this is very much in keeping what mao used to call the war of position. you move through the countryside. you leave deposits of your belief and ideology and infrastructure and by the time you get to where you want to go, y
range. >>> there is new fallout from britain's phone scandal that is threatening rupert murdoch's media empire. murdock is in london trying to do some damage control. >> reporter: media mogul rupert murdoch faced a mob of reporters easy met with his embattled ceo, rebecca brooks, in london. british police will question her later this week about the phone hacking cover-up that happened on her watch. cameras caught murdock reading sunday's final edition of the news of the world. the paper ended a 168-year run after news broke that journalists were hacking the phones of murder and terrorism victims for stories. >> there will have to be some kind of massive, massive clearout of the stables really. it just looks terrible. >> reporter: london's "daily mirror" tabloid is hitting murdock with more claims of corruption involving 9-11 victims. the paper quotes an ex-new york city cop saying news of the world reporters offered to pay him for phone records of the dead. the phone hacking scandal boiled over last week with a case of milly dowler, a british team murdered in 2002. her parents met with
. they cracked the german code. >> there were some of the darkest days of the second world war, but britain's survival was in the balance. out in the a plan to, and -- in the atlantic on shipping convoys were bringing the supplies and munitions, but they were being sought by german submarines. it off heather's nottie germany threatening to win. this is blechly park. seven years ago, these were some of britain's most vital establishments. it was here that they broke the code of the german military. the most brilliant mathematician, crossword lynn was and others were brought together. -- crossword linguists and others were brought together. the british built this to help break the code. it was called colossus. it is generally considered to be the world's first computer. with its coats, which had taken the codebreakers six days to crack by hand, it could not happen in a matter of hours. >> we would have lost the war without it. is that important. >> 70 years after the code breakers worked in total secrecy, their work, which is -- which is said shortened the war by perhaps two years, received t
that. >> we have no evidence of that in norway or in britain. >> but for now, the focus in norway is on the dead and those missing. the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> and as norway continues to mourn, the country's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to friday's attack, but four days on, there are questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the rampage. local residents were the first to organize the rescue. gavin hewitt has been talking to some of those involved. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are still people waiting, with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a camp site. the two launched their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was, they do not trust us. "i cannot trust you." we have to make some comf
and killing -- 30 countries including the u.s., france, and britain has recognized -- have recognized the rebels. with gaddafi still firmly entrenched despite months of bombing, the anti-government forces have stepped up their offenses in western libya. >> heavy fighting continues in western libya. the rebels have waged a five- month campaign aimed at capturing tripoli. gaddafi forces have proved a formidable opponent. the government has received support from the global community. the international contact group has given its full support to libya's transitional council, recommended the formation of an interim government. they have also asked that gaddafi relinquished power. -- gaddafi relinquish power. >> there are no other options. >> it is an important diplomatic milestone for the libyan opposition, especially now that the u.s. has officially recognized the rebel movement. >> we still have to work through various legal issues. we expect this recognition will enable the tnc to access additional sources of funding. >> there has been much to service demands for political and financial
foreign minister, prime minister of israel, and the deputy undersecretary of state for great britain signed a secret protocol providing that israeli troops would invade the sinai peninsula on october 29th. this was the plan. once the israelis advanced toward the canal zone britain and france would issue an ultimatum to israel and egypt to cease fighting and except anglo-french occupation of the canals on if, as expected, egypt rejected the ultimatum britain and france would begin bombardment of egypt on october 301st followed by a troop landings. remember, this was a secret. it was not in the newspapers to read what was in the newspapers that day was that the soviet union had sent troops into budapest, hungary, killing dozens of protesters. eisenhower knew nothing of the secret meeting in paris. that day intelligence advisory committee chaired by cia director allen dulles, the brother of john foster dulles, assumed that war was not imminent and postpone the for the revision of the intelligence estimate. the committee ignored an fbi report that an unnamed country was considering milit
murdoch's media empire. the message is clear, both the u.s. and great britain are turning up the heat. >>> in china, a section of bridge collapses. sending a tourist bus plunging into the forest below and the death toll could get higher. >>> clock is ticking and tensions are soaring and if you want an idea how things heat are over the debt crisis, listen to this. president obama storms out of yesterday's meeting vowing he will veto any extension of the debt ceiling that is only short term. reports say he said to aeric cantor, quote, many could bring down my presidency. >>> the august 2nd deadline is looming and pessimism is growing. a major rating agency says it will review the nation' sterling bond rating for a possible downgrade. we are covering the angles of this all-important debt talk story. dan lothian at the white house with reaction to the extraordinary ratcheting up of tensions. ali velshi is giving us the bottom line on the economics. why should you care that u.s. bonds could face a brutal reality check? ali, let's start with you. a downgrade would be like seeing your person
. could a massive probe now under way in britain happen here in the united states? and the obama money-maybing machine. who's behind the cash and can the republicans compete? >>> president obama and the congressional leadership are under enormous pressure right now, about 40 minutes into their latest round of debt crisis talks. they haveless than three weeks until the deadline to raise the legal limit on the federal debt. and by all accounts, they're still very far apart. what if anything emerges from this meeting? consider the very dire warnings from the chairman of the federal reserve. ben bernanke using very strong words today, telling congress that the global financial system would be thrown into enormous disarray. that's a direct quote, if the u.s. treasury is deadbeat on its debt. >> ff we went so far as to default on the debt, it would be a major crisis. the treasury security is view as the most safest and liquid in the world. it's the foundation for much of our financial system. and the negotiation that it would become suddenly unreliable and ill liquid would throw show shockwa
economy is stable at this time because the government has taken difficult decisions to get to britain's defeat. to -- to britain's debt. and they announced they have no plans to abandoned that plan. >> to norway, and the justice minister praising the fantastic work done by police after the bombing and shooting on utoeya island. but there has been criticism to have time it took police to get to the island. it's emerged that police also overestimated the number of people who died on the island and revised the death toll from 86 to 68. eight people were also killed in the bomb attack and a number of people are still missing from the island. >> the most important thing is we are completely focused on supporting the families of those and all those affected. we have things in mace all over the country and have people in our government affected. we have missing people at utoeya. and we have many people deeply affected. we have to look after them. i'm completely open to discuss how the response to these attacks have been handled. but i would like to emphasize that the police have done a magni
industry. bbc news. >> while the pressure continues to build in britain, as you have seen here in the united states, there are growing calls for investigations into the activities of news corporation. joining me is our washington correspondent. thank you for coming in. who is calling for this investigation, and what would be the focus? >> their two separate areas. it comes from congress, where interest has picked up suddenly. the first and most sensitive area is on the issue of whether or not there was an attempt by a news of the world reporter to hack into or obtain the information that might lead to the ability to hack into the voice mails of 9/11 victims. and various senators and one member of the house, who runs the moment security committee, have called for investigations. he has written to the fbi, calling for an investigation. the second issue which is separate is whether or not the payments through allegedly made in britain by members of the "news of the world," employees of new corp., whether those payments actually breach the foreign corrupt practices act. america tak
of them including france and britain, do have sympathy for the palestinian position. however, they do not want an american veto. they are afraid it could become violent in the occupied territories and that could, perhaps, get entangled in the protest of the wider arab world. that has not happened yet. so far, the air of spring has been very focused on internal issues. -- the era of the spring has been very focused on internal issues. america's standing in the region could take a hard hit, and the western states, too. the europeans are looking for a compromise, trying to convince the destiny is to drop their bid for membership, but to give them enough to get back to the peace process. whether or not they succeed, there is a sense that the arab- israeli conflict is becoming a major issue at the u.n. again and it will dominate in the coming months. >> britain has joined france in suggesting colonel gadhafi could remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. the british foreign secretary has been holding talks with his french counterpart. he said it was up to the libya -- libyan pe
and britain decide that this is really shameful. we don't have any institutions to build defenses. we don't have any institutions to plan and run an operation. never again. so they met on the island. they came off with an agreement. when the european union was set up there always was a security pillar. it had been put aside so that they could focus on trees that affected finance and capital market and movement of people and bringing the continent closer together. but they decided to fire up the security pillar. they set up -- nato is run, by the way, by a board of directors , the north atlantic council. military committee, and then you have various other committees, but those are the key structures that run nato. and so the europeans set up a military committee, military staff. they set up a satellite center in brussels. all the sudden focus woke up in washington and said, hey, what are these europeans doing? of the going to take away what nato is doing? there are to be duplication? the u.s. with a uk set up some ground rules. no, this is all okay, but you can set up a permanent headquart
think the murdoch empire and great britain is coming down. if it leaps the atlantic to the united states, it's really big trouble. and i feel sorry for murdoch going up against the parliamentary committee because it's going to be very, very tough on him. i don't know if he had anything to do with it. but this is aucwfully high up, joe. it's reached to murdoch's son and the prime minister's office in great britain. this is going to metastasize. >> you hear all of the talk in the press about the murdoches, the murdoches, the murdoches. they don't run the company by themselves. there is a board. and at some point, they're going to tell the murdochs this type of dynasty did not work in egypt. it's not going to work in news corp. you're going to have to step down. and i suspect that you're going to see -- i agree with pat. i don't see how the murdoch family survives this. i don't see how the sons take over the empire. this keeps exploding oochlgt. >> -- exploding. >> a couple of things, the brand has been damaged irreparably already, whatever comes across the states here and the department of
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
it at 2.5% of the cost. this is a good investment for britain, for british taxpayers to make sure we reduce inequality in our world. >> can the prime minister explain whether he thinks that the cost of his nhs reforms set to rise even further we now know with the revelation that a new super quango is going to be created. it might be partly responsible putting at risk services at the popular school in my constituency? >> what we've actually seen since this government has taken office is more than 2,000 more doctors but 4,000 fewer managers. and we are cutting bureaucracy by a third. i know they don't like to hear it. but if we'd followed their plans and cut nhs spending, you'd see the number of doctors, the number of nurses, the number of operations going down. and just this morning, we see the figures for the number of diagnostic tests in the u.k. going up. that's because of the investment going in under this government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. will the prime minister be aware of the news this morning that portugal's debt has been downgraded to junk status. does he not agreed that
in arizona. hello. caller: i can see this going on in great britain, i guess the police are involved. but then they are doing it for us in the same manner. scanning e-mails, looking for certain words and what ever. i do not see any difference. i mean, they are exchanging information, but the fact that the government is concerned in one place and not the other is somewhat humorous or dreadful, depending on your point of view. host: thank you for calling the idea this morning. a bit more from the can paulson editorial this morning. every news organization host: next call on the british phone hacking scandal and its impact comes from denver. hello. caller: i'd think it has been going on for a long time in america. the sponsors, rep john de gaulle, michigan, and republicans worked together with the chamber of commerce to defeat it in 1997. him and reagan had health plans to take $1,900,000 in total compensation and resigned. his three underlings took almost 1100 million dollars. host: tie this into what we are talking about. caller: i think that this is going on for a long time. where do
, along with britain to support rebel forces. >>> the uprising in libya is at the center of a local mother's search. her son, a baltimore journalist, disappeared during the first week of the struggle. mary joins us now with more on the story. >> reporter: karen van dyke has travel to the other side of the world and will not give up until she brings her son home. >> overthrowing moammar gadhafi in libya. tear apart a baltimore mother and her son, an independent journalist, at the center of an international mystery. matthew van dyke is an adventurer who frequently left his south baltimore home to explore the middle east on the back of a motorcycle. this spring, he felt a calling to witness history, when the libyan people were trying to overthrow their government. his mother said he headed fearlessly for the action. >> not only was he witnessing, he was right smack in the middle of it. he is in the middle of someone else's war. >> reporter: the last time sharon van dyke heard matthew's voice was march 12th. he told her he was heading to ben gaza and they talked the next day. >> there was a re
that country and keep britain and britain safe from another 9/11 or 7/7. thousands more including many civilians have risked their lives and hundreds have been injured fighting for the security of our nation. they were called to an international coalition involving 48 countries with a specific you and mandate working at the invitation of a democratically elected government. though there have been many difficult times we should be clear about what has been achieved. in 2009 my predecessor, the prime minister told this house that some three quarters of this serious terrorist plots against britain linked afghanistan and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its hea
at home. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: britain today added itself to a list of more than 30 countries, including the united states, now giving diplomatic recognition to the rebels' national transitional council. british foreign secretary william hague: >> the national transitional council has shown its commitment to a more open and democratic libya, something that it is working to achieve through an inclusive political process. this is in stark contrast to qaddafi whose brutality against the libyan people has stripped him of all legitimacy. >> suarez: hague also said the move paves the way for the rebels to get access to $150 million of libyan oil money held in britain. and he announced the expulsion of the few remaining envoys from colonel qaddafi's regime within three days, but they could reportedly be given more time if they choose to defect. qaddafi, meanwhile, continues to reject calls to step down and in a further act of defiance, libyan state television yesterday showed the lockerbie bomber abdelbaset al megrahi at a pro-government rally. his appearance comes nearly t
of israel and patrick dean the deputy undersecretary of state for great britain had a secret protocol providing that israeli troops would invade the sinai peninsula on october 29th. this was the plan. once the israelis advanced towards the suez canal zone britain and france would issue an ultimatum to egypt and israel to accept the canal zone. if as expected israel rejected the ultimatum. followed by troop landing. but remember this was secret. it was not in the newspapers. what was in the newspapers that day was that the soviet union had sent troops into budapest, hungary, killing dozens of protesters. eisenhower knew nothing of the secret meeting in paris. that day the intelligence advisory committee chaired by cia director allen dulles, that's the brother of john forceder dulles and postponed further revision of the intelligence. the committee ignored an fbi report that an unnamed country was considering military action against nasr. on monday october 29th, eisenhower campaigning in florida was handed a note as he boarded his plane for richmond, virginia. the note said that the isr
gets under way, britain has promised to intelligence cooperation. eyewitness accounts and analysis will all be fed in. the questions are, who was behind this and why. >> richard is on his way to the island. he has the latest details on the situation there. >> have actually got boats around the island now where the shooting took place. they are searching because they fear that there may be more bodies in the water. when the gunman opened fire, a very small island. there was huge panic. it is thought to be 600 or 700 people that were on the island at the time. some of them took the water, desperate to escape. some people tried to swim away. there is a fear that more bodies will be found in the water. there may also be more victims inside of the building where the bomb explosion took place in the mid afternoon. it is difficult for the emergency services to get inside the building. there is still a concern that there might be more bombs in the area, and there has been very significant damage to the building. it is dangerous for the emergency services again. >> the suspect who is in cus
include stealing the medical records of britain's first family. liz palmer has the latest. u.s. troops are being cheated out of their money. armen keteyian's investigation shows us that it's happening on their own posts. and passing the wand. michelle miller on "harry potter" fans taking the magic into the future. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, with the car heading for a cliff, republicans and democrats are arguing about whether to turn left or turn right and they are fast running out of road. a deal to raise the government's borrowing limit will have to be done soon or the u.s. will ident and congressionalpr leaders met again this afternoon. the hangup is whether the deal will include tax increases as the democrats insist, or only spending cuts as republicans demand. we have three reports tonight on the deadline to default. first, chip reid at the white house where the president had a news conference today. >> reporter: scott, some republicans are calling for a stopgap measure to give more time to negotiate. the p
getting over. so the war is over and france and britain decide that this is shameful. we don't have many institutions to build or plan and run in the operation. never again. they met to on an island in france and came up with an agreement with the european union was set up there was a security pillar but the was put aside to focus on treaties with the capital markets and movement of people and bringing the continent closer together. nato is run by the border directors and a military committee then various other committees but those are the key structures so the europeans said it up a military committee and a satellite center and all of a sudden the folks say what are these europeans doing? will they take away what nato is doing? will there be duplication? si u.s. at our direction also the u.k. setup ground rules to say this is okay but you cannot set up a permanent headquarters. a few launched a campaign you need to use said that the commander and they came to an agreement to work those out. that only lasted for one campaign. over the last 10 years europeans have spent 27 deployments fro
they call in britain, the gutter press. dan rivers, cnn, london. >> it's not clear what if anything rupert murdoch will say when he sits before parliament at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. >> his media empire hangs in the balance many people say as does his career as news corp ceo. it leads to the question of the day and question that's central to today's hearing, do you think that rupert murdoch knew about the phone hacking? >> on facebook, benny says he owns several corporations in different countries. t there's no way he can be involved in day-to-day operation of any of them. >> peter says on our blog, don't know if he did or not. the issue should be why he created a work culture that allowed this to happen. news corp needs to be held accountable and that includes the top officers of the organization. >> and on facebook, if he knew what his company was doing, shame on him. if he didn't know, double shame on him. a lot of different comments this morning. keep them coming. >> send us an e-mail or tweet or contact us on facebook. >> phone hacking hearing just five minutes away. we'll have live co
's when i stumbled upon william e. dodd. >> britain's parliament has gone into its summer recess. the bbc parliament channel be kept the last several months in the house of commons in british politics in this one-hour record review program. some of the issues covered include the news corp. phone hacking scandal come in the royal wedding in president obama says it. >> hello and welcome to the special edition of the record review, when we look after an eventful summer term at parliament, he turns anything distinguished guests, rigorous questioning and much in the way of political drama. >> for the grandson of a kenyan who served as a cook and the british army to stand before you as president of the united states. >> this is a shocking mass. in fact, it's a scandal. >> have you ever received payment for any news? >> absolutely not. i can't believe he suggested that. >> the fact we do not have democratic legitimacy undermines our capacity to act as a check and balance. >> why disney know about these arguments? the house of commons is on this bill tonight. >> you can ask about strike because t
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